Posts Tagged ‘risk’

kerambit 0

kerambit 0

Last January 2, 2015, at 12:00-15:00 we conducted the first of a series of seminars featuring  the use of the KARAMBIT knife and its applications in Serrada.

the ring

the ring

The Karambit is a South East Asian curved knife, usually found in Silat systems and is a favorite adopted weapon in Filipino Martial Arts. Because of it’s unique properties, such as the use of the curved edge for hooking, trapping and ripping as well as the ring, which allows the use of special applications,  like spinning and flipping the blade in close quarters.

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it’s time for the SHARKNADO!!!

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all hands on deck

Thanks to TACTICOOL for supplying gear!
All in a good days work!

STAY TUNED FOR OUR UPCOMING EVENTS AND SEMINARS!!!

JON ESCUDERO – LIGHTNING COMBATIVES
LIGHTNING SCIENTIFIC ARNIS
You can find us in the USA, CANADA, UK, AUSTRALIA, PHILIPPINES, ISRAEL
to book us for seminars: email – jon.escudero@gmail.com facebook – Jon Escudero

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baton seminar2
The Tactical Baton, also known a telescopic baton is a modernized version of the humble stick so it makes sense that we’d do a seminar on this tool. It’s a great force multiplier, portable and simple to use. There are many versions coming from different brands to suit the different needs of every individual or service.

Lightning Scientific Arnis Israel conducted its first tactical baton seminar last Friday, as the second seminar in a series of its open, in-house seminars. It was well attended by its regular members, friends, the usual suspects and some newcomers to the seminars.

The days training topics consisted of learning safe methods of exit and entry, controlled impact on the centerline, simple trapping and escalations to takedowns with focus on simple movements that can be learned quickly and performed under stress.

Thanks to TACTICOOL for supplying gear!
All in a good days work!

STAY TUNED FOR OUR UPCOMING EVENTS AND SEMINARS!!!

baton seminar5

working the entry

baton seminar3

open WIDE!

baton seminar7

blind-siding technique

baton seminar5

exit strategy

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survivors!!! (those who remembered the group photo 🙂 )

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get down!

baton seminar4

with Tomer TACTICOOL

JON ESCUDERO – LIGHTNING COMBATIVES
LIGHTNING SCIENTIFIC ARNIS
You can find us in the USA, CANADA, UK, AUSTRALIA, PHILIPPINES, ISRAEL
to book us for seminars: email – jon.escudero@gmail.com facebook – Jon Escudero

De Salon, Corto, Tercia Serrada, What do they all have in common? In general they connote close-combat fighting but they each have their own nuance. So, what do they mean, specifically?

De Salon connotes a close range of fighting in the context of fighting indoors, in a closed space with very little room to maneuver. “Salon”, meaning living room or parlour, it conveys the sense that a lot the techniques would be in small frames with small footwork.

Corto also means close range fighting (coming from the three ranges of fighting largo, media, corto), but with emphasis on the weapon movements. Understanding that in the close range, shorter strikes with either chopping or curving angles would be more efficient in hitting and recovering than long arcing strikes. The shorter strikes also expose your arms less in the close range.

Tercia Serrada suggests the principle of “closing-in and jamming” your opponents movements from the “outside”. It also means meeting the attack and redirecting it so that you can expose your opponents weak-side, blind-spot or back.

These are the Core Principles in doing proper Baston Serrada.

intercepting in baston serrada

intercepting in baston serrada

STRIKE CHARACTERISTICS

I already mentioned when I defined Corto that the strikes are meant to be short. But lets refine our definition. In the close range, body positioning is tighter, somewhat similar to a south-paw boxer. Hands are at chest-height, the elbow is close to the ribs, knees bent, the stick in front of the face guarding the body. From this position, full arcing strikes become risky because they make the body over extend making them hard to recover after execution. What is efficient in this range though are shorter, chopping strikes that don’t overextend the arm, exposing the body. Shorter strikes also allow you to reposition your stick faster if you need it to block or defend against a strike you didn’t expect as well as allow you to re-chamber your strike so that you can hit more times.

ACTION SETS

So I’m now going to break things down into Action Sets. These are sets of movements that could either be interpreted as an attack or a defense, depending on the scenario. These are the building blocks that we will use to put together the full movement that is Baston Serrada.

Banda Y Banda

banda y banda

banda y banda

The word “banda” means bounce. So it translates to a “rebounding strike.” What makes it different from a “halfstrike” which returns to its point-of-origin, is that a “banda y banda” strike rebounds to the other side of the body. To further refine this, the chopping action of the banda y banda comes in at a 45 degree angle on one side and exits at a 45 degree angle on the other side creating a “V” shape. This is the angle of the bounce of the banda y banda. The angle makes it easier to move the stick from one side to the other and vice-versa.

Espada y Daga

espada y daga

espada y daga

Literally, it means sword and dagger, but in this case we are referring to the involvement of the empty hand in a checking or pushing motion where the intent of it is to detect and monitor your opponents movements. Basically, the empty hand moves to the sticks position after it has hit its target. This creates a continuous pressure on point of contact giving you a better chance to overwhelm your opponents position.

Krus

krus

krus

The Krus is an inverted vertical strike, like a swinging pendulum, that gets its name from the shape it makes when it is blocked by a horizontal block, forming a “cross”. The objective of this strike is a snapping sneak attack on the lowline towards the knees, groin or elbow. It is also an effective strike when your checking hand is in the way by being on top of your weapon hand.

GOAL

When performing Baston Serrada, it important to check several things

1. Accuracy – Make sure your are hitting what you are aiming for. It’s nice to have a little luck on your side in a fight, but knowing that you can hit anything you aim at is better insurance.

2. Sensitivity – You must successfully detect the intent and motion of your opponent by feeling the pressure of their movements from point of contact. You must also learn to follow your opponents movements and to redirect them to a safe position from which you can take control and counter attack.

3. Timing – The speed and timing of your block, check and counter attack have to be tight enough that there are no gaps in which your opponent can interrupt you. This also means entering at the proper moment and disengaging safely.

4. Pressure – This refers to the line of pressure your strike creates and not necessarily the power behind your strike. It also refers to the process of pushing and jamming your opponents movements continuously and putting him off-balance.

5. Control – We can look at this 2 ways. Controlling your self and controlling your opponent.

a. For yourself, make sure you know where you stick is at all times. Make sure you know what your position is relative to your opponent. Make sure that you can put yourself where you want to be.

b. On your opponent, make sure you know where his weapon is, know if he has a second weapon in the other hand. Drive your opponent where you want him to be.

METHOD

Begin training with a progression in mind. It is important to develop the proper escalation of movements to ensure smooth power delivery and coordination. Develop a rhythm. The timing will become evident to you as you improve. Emphasize and develop the use of proper attributes (strength, speed, stamina).

Banda y Banda  

banda y banda

banda y banda

Start slow with the Banda y Banda. Pay attention to body mechanics. Another important part of the dynamics is how the body moves with the strikes. Ideally the body should be powering the strikes from the ground through the hips.

1. One way to ensure this is to start from the abierta position with the heel of the back foot raised.

2. As you execute the first strike of the Banda y Banda, drop the back heel of your foot. This twists your waist and opens your hip which drives the force through your leg, up back into your arm and out to the stick.

3. On contact, the stick should bounce upward to the other side of your body. On the backhand strike of the Banda y Banda, power it by raising the heel of your back foot and push from your toe. This will push the force up your leg and through your waist, twisting it into your strike.

4. Bounce the strike back into the abierta position.

5. Make sure the tip of your stick points upwards throughout the drill.

Espada y Daga + Banda y Banda

espada y daga banda y banda

espada y daga, banda y banda

This is an escalation of the Banda y Banda drill. The objective is to properly apply the “dagger” hand in a checking position in-between the bouncing sticks.

1. Start like you would normally do the Banda y Banda from the abierta position, checking hand on the centerline, back heel raised.

2. Thrust your empty hand forward, right after your first strike as it bounces to the other side. make sure the shoulder of your weapon hand faces forward and drop your back heel.

3. Twist your waist, raise the heel and push from the toes of your back foot as you perform the return strike of your Banda y Banda. Point the elbow of your empty hand forward, with the empthy hand under your chin.

4. Return your stick to the abierta position and move your hand forward into the checking position.

5. Repeat as necessary.

Espada y Daga + Krus + Banda y Banda

espada y daga, krus,  banda y banda

espada y daga, krus, banda y banda

We can further escalate these movements by adding the “krus”. What this does is that it adds the element of unpredictability by adding a low angle strike which gives you additional options of a strike when the point of your stick is low and a strike on the lowline which can be unexpected. Espada y Daga

1. Start like you would normally do the Banda y Banda from the abierta positon, checking hand on the centerline, back heel raised.

2. Thrust your empty hand forward, right after your first strike as it bounces to the other side. make sure the shoulder of your weapon hand faces forward and drop your back heel. Krus

3. Shift your weight from your front leg to your back leg, lean back sideways from your waist to create a pendulum like movement as you swing your stick upward in a snapping strike from under your arm.

4. From contact, chamber your stick on top of your empty hand side bicep. Banda y Banda

5. Twist your waist, raise the heel and push from the toes of your back foot as you perform the return strike of your Banda y Banda. Point the elbow of your empty hand forward, with the empty hand under your chin.

6. Return your stick to the abierta position and move your hand forward into the checking position.

7. Repeat as necessary.

APPLICATION

Baston Serrada operates as action-sets on triggers from point of contact. The information you get from point of contact should trigger your reaction, whether it is to go completely on the offensive, redirect the attack and counter, or stay on the defensive. It is ideal to “blind-side” your opponent by going to the outside, but you should still be able to hold your ground on the inside if you cant regardless of the attack. A constant barrage of strikes from multiple angles assisted by the “checking hand should keep your opponent off-balance. Some simple rules of thumb are:

1. redirect the attack

2. move to a better position

3. neutralize the weapon / weapon hand

4. off-balance your opponent

5. attack from an unexpected angle

6. keep hitting

7. repeat as necessary, not necessarily in any order

ESCALATIONS

There are obviously other options that may be inserted into this structure. We still have not covered the different possible blocks that work well with Baston Serrada, nor the different types of disruptive attacks you can insert between the movements, as well as positions favorable for disarms or takedowns. This makes Baston Serrada a very flexible system. I didnt say its going to be easy though. As with anything worthwhile, you must put in the time and effort to develop these skills to their highest potential.

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Of Poses, and Posing Well…

Anyone can fight.

But not all fight well. It is about successfully accomplishing your goal while reducing risk on your person.  So what’s the point I’m trying to make?  I’m going to paraphrase a line from Gavin de Becker’s  book, “the Gift of Fear.”  It’s a great book and an eye-opener and one of the first books that influenced my way of thinking about fighting and self-defense.  To me, fighting is about “high-stakes decision making under complete stress.”

Fighting is a messy deal. It can happen at the worst of times when you are least prepared physically or mental.  Fighting is a non-cooperative activity where the other participant seeks to do you bodily harm.  So to me, fighting smart is about increasing your chances of success in a fight and reducing the amount of risk involved fighting, not just getting the job done. What could be more important to you at that time than protecting your life and the lives you fight for?

I find that all of arguments about which martial art is more applicable in a realistic scenario or which system is more effective to be moot and pointless. Why? Because, there are many kinds of “fighting.”  Prize-fighting, street fighting, self-defense, wars to name a few All of them have one thing in common- a goal. So it makes sense to take actions that support this goal especially since many things are different in each scenario. So to clarify this, let’s outline some criteria to determine what “fighting well” means.  This way, we can evaluate and validate our training, regardless of the art we practice.  This is by no means going to be complete as each art or style will have their own criteria specific to their needs, but it’s certainly a good place to start.

fighting smart is about increasing your chances of success in a fight and reducing the amount of risk involved fighting

HITTING AND NOT GETTING HIT
Who doesn’t hate double-kills in sparring?  It’s either you were too slow or the opponent was too fast.  Either way, it is energy wasted, time wasted and you have to once again to re-evaluate and re-engage your opponent. This is energy that wouldn’t have been wasted had you been successful.  So put some effort into NOT GETTING HIT.  This means not taking too much or any damage as you fight. In weapons fighting in general, it not a good idea to be trading hits but is something taken for granted with protective gear. To that point, there is still value in the old way of training without all the protective gear.  Simply, you learned once and very quickly that getting hit is not nice at all. This can be further expounded by range or distance. Are you able to stay out of his reach and within yours?  If your opponent is too fast to attack outright, can you take the hits on your defense before you attack. There are many other options better than just trying to bash your opponent faster, harder or more times than he can bash you.  You need to consider that every attack has a cost, and that sometimes the cost can be heavy.

GET A BETTER POSITION 
A one-on-one fight is usually assumed to be “up-front” and “face to face”.  The tricky part of this is that all of your opponents weapons are facing you (arms, legs, elbows, knees, head).  Coming in at an angle to reduce the number of weapons he can use on you can significantly increase your chances of success and simultaneously  reduce the amount of risk.

REDUCE HIS ABILITY TO HIT YOU
Throw a wet blanket over him I say.  If you don’st happen to have that wet blanket on you, reduce his ability to hit you by reducing his ability to move his arms and legs, by putting him off balance, or by forcing him to go on the defensive.

HAVE A FINISHING STRIKE
Tapping your opponent doesn’t really work much.  I will probably serve to annoy or anger him more.  Have a strike, punch, throw, kick etc. that has the potential to knock out your opponent. This needs to be something devastating enough to knock your opponent out and finish the fight.  The premise of this is that, if he is too preoccupied with trying to recover, he is NOT Fighting you.

HAVE AN EXIT STRATEGY
Knowing how to make an exit in the midst of combat is a useful skill especially if you start to get overwhelmed even if it means going through your opponent to make an exit. Having an exit strategy is very important especially if your goal is saving your life. Prolonged or extended contact exposes you to more risk and danger.

With criteria like these you can evaluate and validate your training methodology and see if you are meeting your success criteria. Tools like this can help tweak your training experience and add value to your understanding.